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Human assembly lines that were created to carry down supplies raise their arms to ignite silence so the cries of those under rubble can be heard.

1:14 pm

The plan for September 19th, 2017 was to get organized and to be productive. After much dilly-dallying with my affairs, weekend escapades to paradise lands and loafing around, that Tuesday was to be devoted to completing long-avoided errands. By 1 pm, I made the decision that in 15 mins I would begin arranging after I showered. By 1:13 pm, I was in the bathroom, when I noticed a change in my vision. For many years, I have “suffered” from low blood pressure and mild dizziness is quotidian. The swaying rapidly gained force and in a slight second I realized, this isn’t a flaw in my circulation, but rather a grievous adjustment of the Earth. I held on tightly to the sink, calming myself by repeating the sole mantra I will never forget, “this will end soon,” concentrating on the small window drowning the shower in white light. I paled at the sight of the walls moving like elastic, back and forth like a slow-motion video of gelatin on a plate. Somewhat late, but just in time, my reflexes to remove myself from a potentially crumbling building kicked in, and I ran down the steps. Everything after those estimated eternal twenty seconds and the days that followed can only be described as a helplessly confusing and a dreadfully long nightmare. 

The screams.

The barking.

The sirens.

The anguish.

Continue reading

My Ode to You, Wonder Women

I never admired Wonder Woman

Not because she is a female but because of what she represents

The ideal that one woman stands as a champion above them all

Wonder Woman may have strength comparable to Greek myths but she pales in comparison to what I see everyday

I’ve heard the songs dedicated to women that fail to emphasize what I see

That woman are more than pretty eyes and thick thighs

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“Picking Flowers” by Trash Riot

More than full lips and slender hips

More than protruding chests and ample breasts

When I look at a woman I see the very embodiment of greatness

I see a person that constantly has to endure sexualization thrust upon her by an ignorant society

I see a person that does thrice the work for a quarter of the recognition and yet continues to press on

I see a never-faltering pillar still standing, not in spite of the opposition thrown against her, but because of it

Yes Ladies, you do run the world Continue reading “My Ode to You, Wonder Women”

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Art by Erin Armstrong 

It’s time to have “the talk”

A few weeks ago, Procter & Gamble released a “controversial” commercial on having the race talk. The video, full of emotive scenes and realities, depicts throughout the decades the obstacles and lessons Black parents have had to express to their children, even to this day. The main lesson being taught? Teaching children of color how to build resilience to combat racism. 

As defined by Google, resilience is: the capacity to recover quickly from difficulties; toughness.

In other words, you are building a protection and an ability to snap back from adversity. Sounds hard and it is, but as we recently have seen, racism is very much alive in the U.S. And, because of the constant afflictions thrown at parents of color, it is easy to forget our future is in our children. We mustn’t forget we have a large influence on who and how they grow up to be. Our children, who are inevitably viewing the unnecessary deaths, venomous hatred, and hostility through millions of portable screens, are absorbing the information that seems almost impossible to filter out. What we need to be asking ourselves is, how do we prepare children of color for the reality, rather than let them fend for themselves?

Now, before you rant off on thinking I am defending a political party, I will show you why “the talk” needs to be had, based on our beloved science. 

According to the American Psychological Association (APA), resilience is: “the process of adapting well in the face of adversity, trauma, tragedy, threats or significant sources of stress — such as family and relationship problems, serious health problems or workplace and financial stressors. It means ‘bouncing back’ from difficult experiences… Resilience is not a trait that people either have or do not have. It involves behaviors, thoughts and actions that can be learned and developed in anyone.”

Hard, but doable. 

“…kids who experienced more racism…were more likely to report sleep troubles, mood swings, difficulty concentrating or other symptoms of depression.”

But then… shouldn’t we just consistently shield children from being mistreated? Yes, but we can’t. Parents cannot entirely protect them from the exterior world, they cannot hide them from all the school mates, neighbors, store clerks, teachers, social media, anyone and everyone. Is it fair? Absolutely not. Children are children, they know no differences unless they are taught, they know no hate, unless they are taught. Their main concern should be to play, learn, and continue expanding their imaginatively rich curiosity. And it isn’t fair some children are to be burdened with learning how to defend themselves when parents cannot protect, they shouldn’t have to. But they must.

Because racial differences start young:

“Most children actively notice and think about race. A new study has found that children develop an awareness about racial stereotypes early, and that those biases can be damaging… it can affect how they respond to everyday situations, ranging from interacting with others to taking tests. For example, African American and Latino youths who were aware of broadly held stereotypes about their groups performed poorly on a standardized test, confirming the negative stereotype in a self-fulfilling prophecy.”

And by 9? 

“…kids who experienced more racism…were more likely to report sleep troubles, mood swings, difficulty concentrating or other symptoms of depression.”

All ages? 

“…findings suggest that discrimination experience can have biological impacts in pregnancy and across generations… increase stress hormones that tax the body’s immune system, and over time can erode physical health.”

Not only does racism aggressively affect humans on an emotional, self-esteem, and psychological level, but long exposures of discrimination can even begin to affect people on a physical level (don’t even get me started on epigenetics). However difficult and painful it may be, we must begin teaching our children to arm themselves with resilience, because racism affects ALL age groups.

Furthermore,

if you are interested on beginning the talk with your children, read these tips on age appropriateness, how to‘s, and much more: http://www.apa.org/pi/res/parent-tips.pdf

Here is the commercial produced by Procter & Gamble: 

Thought #8: We NEED more help

During my transitional period of post-graduation into the real world, I decided to test out other aspects of psychology rather than the traditional path of higher education blah blah blah. I began working for the largest psychology non-profit in the country (part-time) and would volunteer at another mental health non-profit near me. My volunteering consisted of: 

  • Sitting at a desk, answering calls for consecutive hours
  • Lingering, waiting for someone to give me a ring

And as dull as it may sound, it wasn’t. If anything, it was one of the most constructive experiences of my brief life. Because these calls left me feeling an overabundance of strong emotions but allowed me to be aware of a massive, not often discussed, issue we have.

The HelpLine is a free national service in which anyone in need of mental health resources, assistance or simple conversation can call. Most calls consisted of patients, parents, or friends looking for resources pertaining to finding a nearby psychiatrist, mental health insurance, or clinics. Simple, easy search in our resources binder. 

But the other calls.  Continue reading “Thought #8: We NEED more help”