Cultural Perspectives Through Soup

As I sit down in my usual seat at the round dinner table, I look at the different dishes of food that my father has prepared. Looking at his cooking, my father speaks with pride in Mandarin Chinese, “I spent two hours boiling the soup to let the flavor seep in. It’s not as good as the one people make in Taiwan, but it’s the best here.” The contagious smile on my dad’s face spreads to my mother. She nods in agreement, “I brought this soup to my co-worker’s house yesterday and she said her dreams came true.” My dad adds, “ I added some red peppers and green onions for aesthetics.” I look blankly at the soup as my parents banter back and forth about the flavor and presentation of the soup. I am clearly indifferent about the subject of soup and mumble to myself, “It’s only soup. Who cares?” Continue reading “Cultural Perspectives Through Soup”

North and South

I am a very restless person. Not in a sort of impatient way, but after some time, I itch for an escape. And perhaps it’s because I continuously look for an out to my mundane responsibilities (feel free to judge, maybe your thoughts will cause a stir in my mentality), but reasons aside, I love to travel. And for some close minded mentality, I always strive to visit wonders outside of the U.S., therefore, recently, after I finished an internship I decided to visit those closest to me. Here is a recount of a 2-week trip, from Philadelphia, New York City, Raleigh, and Wilmington. Thank you, friends, for: 

  • showing me in a different perspective the importance of eating healthy
  • teaching me how to grill 
  • having insanely philosophical conversations 
  • showing me the beach 
  • and most importantly, taking time out of your days to let me into your homes 
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The Brooklyn Bridge
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Chinatown
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The unforgettable Times Square

Thought # 7: On a separate visit to NYC, in a random impulsive decision fueled by youthful energy, I viewed Times Square at 4 am. Let me tell you, Times Square at 4 am is a docile beast, replete with the never overawe of its lights, but silence, and a handful of people. It is magnificent, I felt free to run around (which we did), wherever I pleased and gawk without worrying if my presence is in someone else’s way. Try it out sometime. 

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The Blind Elephant ~ secluded speakeasy, knock a couple times, eye hole opens, inspects, and perhaps entry will be granted

 

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A Parisian lookalike balcony located in Wilmington 

 

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!!! heaven 
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the boys

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backyard in Raleigh 

 

 

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photo taken by me

 

The Virtues of Isolation 

In the ’80s, the Italian journalist and author Tiziano Terzani, after many years of reporting across Asia, holed himself up in a cabin in Ibaraki Prefecture, Japan. “For a month I had no one to talk to except my dog Baoli,” he wrote in his travelogue A Fortune Teller Told Me. Terzani passed the time with books, observing nature, “listening to the winds in the trees, watching butterflies, enjoying silence.” For the first time in a long while he felt free from the incessant anxieties of daily life: “At last I had time to have time.”

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